Category: ocd

  • Protected: Address Staring OCD

    There is no excerpt because this is a protected post.

  • Somatic Obsessions (exclusive content)

    How To Apply Exposure Response Prevention This document focuses on exposure-response prevention (ERP) for somatic obsessions. It includes regular homework checks to reinforce the learning objectives. The educational material has eight parts that begin with understanding overt and covert rituals, bodily obsessions, and how to create a hierarchy of fears. Also, monitoring anxiety when doing […]

  • How To Manage Dissociation (exclusive content)

    Includes Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder On and Off the Autism Spectrum Carol Edwards’ six-part tutorial discusses dissociative states, such as depersonalisation and derealisation. It also talks about dissociation unique to OCD (a defence mechanism) when faced with obsessions. It includes modified cognitive behavioural strategies for people on the autism spectrum. It is an informative document and is suitable […]

  • Address Staring OCD: Look Inside

    Staring OCD is a term to describe looking at people “inappropriately”. Carol Edwards is one of those people and has now recovered by ninety per cent. So, her goal is to raise awareness of this hidden variation of OCD, also referred to as Visual Tourettic OCD. She knows many people who struggle with it, most […]

  • 3 Crucial Reasons Why Exposure Therapy Fails In OCD That Isn’t Treatment Resistant

    3 Crucial Reasons Why Exposure Therapy Fails In OCD That Isn’t Treatment Resistant

    People who struggle with false desire in OCD usually think the solution is to work harder at preventing the feared outcome. In such cases, it can lead to a term known as absorption. Subsequently, these people conflict and become even more preoccupied with the obsession. In that case, the habituation process in ERP can be affected, but is not treatment refractory.

  • How Folding Your Arms Can Help You Power Through Peripheral Staring

    How Folding Your Arms Can Help You Power Through Peripheral Staring

    There are different techniques you can use to suppress the urge to look in situations I’ve just described. I’ll share one involving competing responses where a specific discomfort must overpower the premonitory urge to stare. This technique addresses the tic, not an obsession and compulsion related to it.

  • False Memory OCD: Why Your Brain Gets It Wrong And How To Resolve It

    False Memory OCD: Why Your Brain Gets It Wrong And How To Resolve It

    Consider your brain’s unconscious mind when you find yourself obsessively worrying about a false memory. Previously, it will have picked up on something and triggered your brain’s amygdala to warn you of danger. As a result, it activates anxious feelings, so you do mental and physical checks to ensure things are safe, albeit unsuccessfully. Specifically, […]

  • Consider Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder And The Recovery Process

    Consider Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder And The Recovery Process

    OBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE DISORDER (OCD) has two essential characteristics: obsessions and compulsions. Intrusive thoughts, images, and urges come into one’s mind involuntarily. If you are vulnerable to developing OCD, these can be the trigger for obsessions. External stimuli, such as coming into contact with dirt, can also trigger obsessional fears. Compulsions are the behaviours people do to […]

  • Staring OCD: Ever Wondered Why People Sneak A Look At Others Privates?

    Staring OCD: Ever Wondered Why People Sneak A Look At Others Privates?

    Ever wondered why people stare at others privates? Have you asked yourself if it’s a tic, an obsession, a compulsive action or all three? Visual Tourettic OCD Staring OCD is now known as Visual or Ocular Tourettic OCD. That makes sense to me because the urge to stare feels like an involuntary eye movement is […]

  • How Molly Unravelled Doubt In The Here And Now And Survived OCD

    How Molly Unravelled Doubt In The Here And Now And Survived OCD

    Molly was forever yielding to compulsions because she feared something terrible would happen if she didn’t. For example, it felt to Molly as though she had to obey the thoughts in her head and let them choose almost everything she did. That would be like what to wear, what to eat, which item to select […]